NaNo 2017

I have not completed my writing goals for this year. I’d hoped to have 3 novels edited by now. I’ve done 3 chapters of the first novel. And yet, I couldn’t resist doing NaNo again this year. If all goes well, I’ll have a 4th novel that needs drastic editing in a month. You can watch my stats as the month progresses.

Clean as You Bake (or What I Learned from NaNoWriMo)

I learned something important about myself today while baking cookies for a pot luck. I love baking, but I haven’t done a lot of it lately since I’ve been a bit under the weather. As I was happily dropping ingredients into the mixer, I took the no longer needed measuring cup to the sink, gave it a quick rinse and dropped it into the dishwasher. Back at the mixer, I put each ingredient away as soon as it was used. By the time I was…

Meet Chirp

This is “Chirp,” the first alien we meet at the Spaceport. He’s about 3 feet tall. What would you do if this walked up to you and started trying to communicate?

Beams of Light on a Golden Lake

This stunning Earth image taken by the Expedition 47 crew on May 31, 2016, from the International Space Station looks from northwestern China on the bottom into eastern Kazakhstan. The large lake in Kazakhstan with golden sun glint is the crescent-shaped Lake Balkhash, the second largest lake in Central Asia. via NASA http://ift.tt/1UiwouL

The Little Fox and the Giant Stars

Isn’t this one stunning? Such beauty is breathtaking. Like the most amazing sunset. New stars are the lifeblood of our galaxy, and there is enough material revealed by this Herschel infrared image to build stars for millions of years to come. via NASA http://ift.tt/1XgnuRn

Atlantis on STS-101 Mission

Flames from the solid rocket boosters lit up the clouds of smoke and steam trailing behind shuttle Atlantis on May 19, 2000, as it lifted off on mission STS-101. It was the shuttle program’s third space station assembly flight, and first space flight for astronaut Jeff Williams, currently aboard the station as a member of the Expedition 47 crew. via NASA http://ift.tt/20aXPa5

Stargazing From Space

Isn’t this the most amazing view? It will play a part in some of the Spaceport novels I’m working on. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) see the world at night on every orbit — that’s 16 times each crew day. An astronaut took this broad, short-lens photograph of Earth’s night lights while looking out over the remote reaches of the central equatorial Pacific Ocean. via NASA http://ift.tt/1rRGKHd

Hubble Spies a Spiral Snowflake

Together with irregular galaxies, spiral galaxies make up approximately 60 percent of the galaxies in the local universe. However, despite their prevalence, each spiral galaxy is unique — like snowflakes, no two are alike. This is demonstrated by the striking face-on spiral galaxy NGC 6814. via NASA http://ift.tt/1TKk7dX

Hubble Spies the Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 4394

Shown in this Hubble Space Telescope image, NGC 4394 is the archetypal barred spiral galaxy, with bright spiral arms emerging from the ends of a bar that cuts through the galaxy’s central bulge. These arms are peppered with young blue stars, dark filaments of cosmic dust, and bright, fuzzy regions of active star formation. via NASA http://ift.tt/1rZSvvv

Light Echoes

This illustration shows a star surrounded by a protoplanetary disk. A new study uses data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and four ground-based telescopes to determine the distance from a star to the inner rim of its surrounding protoplanetary disk. Researchers used a method called “photo-reverberation,” also known as “light echoes. via NASA http://ift.tt/26rHbbb